“Political Chess” Becomes “Political Ping-Pong”


I wrote a lengthy post about the political situation in Armenia last week. Today I’m happy to register, that all I said holds true, with one little exception – political chess just became political ping-pong.

The video says it all [in Armenian].

Meanwhile, I’m too tired today after the hassle of live-broadcasting the opposition rally. So I’ll update this post with more details and tell exactly what i mean tomorrow.

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9 thoughts on ““Political Chess” Becomes “Political Ping-Pong”

  1. hey levon mevon: go ara, herracir mezanic. your turkish-jewish ppl and homeland are waiting for you. go ara, they waiting !

    now leave us alone, so we can keep our homeland: Armenian

  2. just one comment

    Remember March 1, 2011? Those 15 categoric and precise demands from ANC, which later narrowed down to 3 very simple ones to show good progress for both sides.

    Remember those 15 demands (compensating to the families of victims, annul the ban on street trade, including Artsakh as a party to negotiations, making minimum salary $ 200, etc.)

    Apparently, Levon thinks that compensating to the families of victims, raising minimum salary and including Artsakh in the negotiations is less important than rallying on Liberty Square, which they did in any case at every recent meeting.

    Now imagine the families of those killed and injured, or those getting minimum salary hearing those demands on March 1, 2011 and then later learning, that those demands are not in the agenda anymore…

    Can anyone tell me what is going on with once strong (although always stupid and corrupt) opposition?

    • Those other 12 demands weren’t abandoned, but the 3 being discussed were prioritized–you can read what their strategy is here: http://www.epress.am/en/2011/04/22/fulfilling-our-demands-in-part-is-not-acceptable-for-us-zurabyan
      You or I or anybody may disagree with those priorities, but it’s a mischaracterization to say that the other 12 points have been forgotten. And considering the irritation this week of oligarch MPs Hayrapetyan and Tsarukyan, and Hovik Abrahamyan’s Facebook :) sniping at them, economic reforms are apparently being discussed behind the government’s closed doors–let’s all hope for Armenia’s sake that this time there is some action along with the talk.
      Everywhere in the world politics is a game and a strategy, which is why most of us would not dream of being politicians. Compromise is part of democracy–what’s odd to me is that those who keep espousing evolution instead of revolution react negatively when that is exactly what seems to be happening…

        • “Remember March 1, 2011? Those 15 categoric and precise demands from ANC, which later narrowed down to 3 very simple ones to show good progress for both sides.

          Remember those 15 demands (compensating to the families of victims, annul the ban on street trade, including Artsakh as a party to negotiations, making minimum salary $ 200, etc.)

          Now imagine the families of those killed and injured, or those getting minimum salary hearing those demands on March 1, 2011 and then later learning, that those demands are not in the agenda anymore…

          Can anyone tell me what is going on with once strong (although always stupid and corrupt) opposition?”

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