The Economist says Armenia is "in the vice"

A view of Mt. Ararat from Yerevan
A view of Mt. Ararat from Yerevan | Photo by Ֆեյսբուքահայություն

“Armenia has a class of “30-something” technocrats, whose western education and global outlook means they are less rooted in the Soviet mentality than their elders. That bodes well for the future,” The Economist writes in a blog-post about Armenia published this week. Continue reading “The Economist says Armenia is "in the vice"”

Armenia Improves its Position by 6 Points in Latest Doing Business Report

Armenia has significantly improved its position in the latest Doing Business report published annually by the International Finance Corporation and the World Bank.
Armenia has moved up 6 points reaching the 55th slot among 183 countries covered by the report.
The Doing Business project provides objective measures of business regulations for local firms in 183 economies and selected cities at the subnational level and is considered an important indicator for driving foreign investments to a country. Continue reading “Armenia Improves its Position by 6 Points in Latest Doing Business Report”

Motorists in Armenia ‘buckle-up’ in disbelief

CIMG0469

Government approved National Transportation Safety strategy pushes forward with car seat belts

Hundreds of drivers in capital Yerevan were pulled off to the sidewalks and fined by the police this week for not fastening their car seatbelts. The large-scale police operation was widely covered prime-time by Public TV of Armenia. The capital had changed beyond recognition next day – 90% of drivers were wearing their safety belts.

Continue reading “Motorists in Armenia ‘buckle-up’ in disbelief”

Corruption in World Bank projects in Armenia Finally Make News Agenda

The World bank scandal became one of those, so far rare cases, when an important news item is consistently filtered out of the news agenda by traditional media, and only continuous blogging efforts persist in exposing it until the item finally becomes center of attention. As Onnik Krikoryan reports, although media in Armenia refused to cover the World Bank corruption scandal in Armenia several months ago, continuous efforts by British whistleblower Bruce Tasker on his own blog, Blowing the World Bank Whistle and also Oneworld Multimedia, the most popular English language Armenian blog,  finally rendered results. And although so far it is only RFE/RL reporting the developments, looks like the story will no longer stay in oblivion:

A U.S. anti-corruption watchdog joined on Thursday a British whistleblower in accusing the World Bank of covering up what they see as gross misuse of a $30 million loan that was meant to upgrade Armenia’s battered water infrastructure.
[]
Tasker claims that the installation of water meters was a major source of corruption among Armenian and foreign officials as well as private firms involved in the project’s implementation. He says local contractors alone were able to pocket up to $10 profit on the sale of each meter by charging customers for installation.

Onnik Krikoryan further reports, how media outlets have been reluctant to “get on the bad side of the World Bank”:

Tasker set up his blog when news outlets here refused to cover the story at the beginning of the year although the former finally did so only after this blog brought the alleged scandal to greater public attention. Eventually, some media outlets here did follow suit, but many publications here and abroad were hesitant in taking material from yours truly when I approached them. Nobody wanted to get on the bad side of the World Bank.
However, New Internationalist published my short piece on Tasker and his battle with the World Bank at the end of October. Now, RFE/RL reports that the scandal has hit the big time in Yerevan. However, the World Bank continue to deny any wrongdoing. Time will tell.

Scroll to top