Boutique construction at the expense of Mashtots park resumes amid protests

A week-long sit-in by Armenian environmental activists was dispersed today as police used force to make space for the construction of fashion boutiques in one of central Yerevan’s few remaining green areas.

The activists claim that the construction of the boutiques in the little ragged park next to Yerevan’s central Mashtots avenue is illegal and should be called off.

Meanwhile, the municipal authorities say the construction is legal and should go on notwithstanding protests.

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26 thoughts on “Boutique construction at the expense of Mashtots park resumes amid protests

  1. WEAR IS THE OPPOSITION ?????? iF ARMENIA HAD A WORKING DEMOCRACY THEN THIS IS A PERFECT TIME FOR THE OPPOSITION TO BE On THE side oF THE PEOPLE ??? WEAR IS RAFFI LA BOY AND LEVON THE SMOKER ????? IS THE OPERA SQUARE THE ONLY PLACE THEY KNOW ????

    1. Jarangutyun MPs are with the activists supporting them. As well as many of the people are familiar faces that took part in opposition rallies.
      On the other hand ANC is keeping low as otherwise they will be blamed in hijacking this movements. Which will be used by the state media to discredit these movements. however there was still this: http://www.a1plus.am/am/social/2012/02/17/hak-youth

  2. A major aspect here is undermined by press and activists . The area is right under the windows of maternity hospital where babies are born each day. So what will hear and smell the new born babies from day one of their lives? Shoppers noises, car fumes and cigarette smoke. This is totally criminal. What can be expected from junk like this: http://svejk-am.livejournal.com/44138.html and their sponsers?

    1. Another thing. I seem to remember that area being a dusty, ruined eyesore which already had a few boudka style cafes. There seemed to be a couple of sunflower seed selling old folk there at all times.

      Maybe I am missing something.

        1. No, the last time I walked by that area was in 2007 I think. There were a couple of budka cafes, a gaudy pharmacy and a lot of dust. Maybe it got cleaned up after that — and hopefully the elderly now get enough pensions not to go and sell sunflower seeds on the streets.

          1. The poster by the name of Armenia seems to think that it’s not ragged and implies that it’s a nice place.

            Maybe to him the Budkeq are an improvement. I don’t know – every person has his or her own viewpoint and taste.

    1. @Observer,
      Do you know who is behind these “boutiques”? Seems as though there is no stopping the illegal construction of these boutiques. I was just watching a video that shows them doing work at midnight, which I think is illegal in Yerevan, no?

      So who is behind all this construction? Are these people so powerful that they have bought the mayor, who can’t even address the issue with the protestors? Are they this powerful that they can get away with all these illegal activities and the destruction of an iconic area for the citizens of Yerevan?

      I can’t seem to put my finger on any laws in Armenia. Aren’t there lawyers and judges in Armenia? Don’t these lawyers and judges practice law? I mean, why are people even turning into lawyers if all these laws are being broken? Or is the real question, are these people turning into lawyers and judges to make money under the table?

      I really want to know though who has a hand in these boutiques, because these people must have some major pull in Armenia.

      Thanks!

      1. Names of former Yerevan mayor Gagik Beglaryan and former Minister of Transport and Communication Edvard Madatyan are mentioned as owners of the boutiques. Both are very influential in getting / forcing / bribing votes for the authorities in the upcoming parliamentary elections, so nobody’s gonna dare to stop them.

        1. So then what you are telling me is that the law is being broken and can be broken anytime? That these guys are above the law and they can do as they please?

          1. Well, I can’t say that the law is being broken. If the municipality allowed the construction, that would technically mean, that the law is not broken. That can only be established in court, no?

          1. Well let me rephrase that, the law is being changed. And how is it being changed, by bribes. I don’t know what the fine print says, but from what I’ve heard, and correct me if I’m wrong, the boutiques have been constructed in an illegal way at an illegal time of day. But as you said, things are done by force and bribe, which really disgusts me. And to add fuel on the fire, these boutiques sell Turkish products.

            I really don’t know what to say, other then I’m disgusted by the way things are run. I really hope victory comes the way of the activists. If it doesn’t, then this is another victory for the oligarch. And to me, that’s a big slap in the face to the honest citizens of Armenia.

  3. FINALLY THE FUTURE OF ARMENIA… ITS YOUTH ARE CLAIMING ITS RIGHT , A BRIGHTER ARMENIA A ARMENIA WEAR PEOPLE ARE ENGAGED IN HOW THEY WANT THERE COUNTRY TO BE !!! NOT LIKE THE OLD GENERATION WHICH ONLY DREAM OF MOVING TO LA TO WORK FOR 1 DOLLAR CAR WASH ;))))))

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